Twenty-One

Day 2 of Aaron Merke‘s Merkeshop!Improv was just as wonderful.
There were so many terms I’d learned way back in the ’90’s that I’d re-interpret when Long-form improv was described and I’d sift it through my own brain.
Like: “Don’t drop your gig=Shelving”: to have an idea and then dismiss it and not use it again, or “Waffling= Wimping”: to be vague in your choices and not commit.
It was suggested that we watch Spongebob Squarepants to see the amount of Initiation going on, but I’d neglected it and I’m without a tv right now.
Learning more about the differences between long-form and short-form or TheatreSports was expanding, since I’d only done the latter for a few years.
It’s harder to try to think of what to do next than it is to trust the moment and “let things happen, man”.

  • Long-form: take your time, man; Nurture.
  • Short form: Get’er done in 3-4 minutes; Escalate.
  • Women “nurture the scene” but tend to be too polite. Men are more direct and tend to break boundaries.
  • La Ronde: Long-form improv, but with the same characters, going more than once. Referenced the play “Our Town”.
  • The Bat, which is done in the dark, like being present for a radio show.
  • The Movie: Painting a town, telling a story like reading a screenplay.

Aaron also uses the term “learning the math” or “know the math”, some sentence with the word math in it.

In order to get back to something, you have to get away from it

  • The Living Room starts with a group on stage, sitting around and telling stories, then a second group creating scenes based on whatever they gather from it; truthful monologues

So much to learn! I should attempt and fail this stuff at the King’s Head Pub.

I was assistant casting director for a friend’s short film this weekend (Hi Fernando!).
As an actor, it was insightful in that you could see what talent there is in this city and how ignored it is by the industry. Several people I’d never heard of, most others I’d know and saw how great they were. You always hear about how each actor brings something unique to the auditions, and I actually saw it. I can honestly say there were no bad actors, not one of them disappointed. I’ll go away from my future auditions feeling better, unless I know I really blew it. I don’t play on being a casting director anytime soon, but if I had the chance again, I’d play along. I felt like such a fly-on-the-wall.

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One thought on “Twenty-One

  1. I did get a chance to watch Spongebob Squarepants: holy! Every sentence everyone made had statements flying out of them. Barely any questions made, unless a statement was buried in them. Impressive. Just goes to show you that animation is highly underrated and underappreciated.

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